Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Trove Tuesday - Missing Persons - James Agnew


This week my Trove Tuesday post revolves around James Agnew - son of James and Ellen (Alicia) Agnew of Cooma.

The first mention of James Agnew in Trove occurs in a list of emigrants arriving by the ship Waverley from Dublin in 1847. He is one of the 2 sons of Alicia (who was know as Ellen in Australia) Agnew. Alicia and her family joined her husband James Snr in Australia in 1847. Her sister-in-law Catherine who is also mentioned below did not arrive on the Waverley but came the following year on the Success.


Sydney Morning Herald, 9 November 1847, p. 3
Some time between 1847 (when he was about 13) and 1885 James Agnew left Cooma and headed south to Sandhurst in Victoria. His family lost track of him there and the following advertisement was placed in The Argus in 1885 by his younger sister Matilda who was anxious to contact him.


The Argus, 24 Aug 1885, p. 1
Reading this now, I would have loved more detail. When did he leave the Monaro and when did the family last hear from him? Had he married and if so, did he have children? Without Trove this reference to James Agnew would have remained lost unless there was a serendipitous find!

Perhaps as other newspapers are digitised and are searchable via Trove I may find further references to James Agnew and discover what happened to him. Family stories suggest that a descendant from Victoria visited Cooma many years later but I do not know who this was.

If you are descended from James Agnew I'd love to hear from you.









Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Family Homes - No 3 - Moolan Downs, Queensland

My previous Family Home post showed the childhood home of Catherine Ellen Dawson. After leaving Tasmania Catherine moved to Melbourne with her mother and siblings after the death of her father Dr William Lee Dawson.

Catherine married Gustav Baumgarten in Melbourne on 30th November 1876. They lived at Pleasant Bank Vineyard at Barnawatha. According to the Cyclopedia of Victoria they had 180 acres of vines, 465 acres of agricultural and grazing land and a further 300 acres under cultivation. 

During 1908 the Baumgarten family moved from Barnawatha to Moolan Downs, near Meandarra west of Dalby. They left a thriving business with an established homestead and moved to western Queensland. One of their first tasks when they arrived was to build the dwelling shown below.



Original dwelling at Moolan Downs - c1908

The second house at Moolan Downs

The final homestead at Moolan Downs


One can only admire our early pioneering families. Gustav died at Moolan Downs only four years after their arrival in 1912. I'm not sure if the final homestead was built before his death or not. Catherine lived there until her death in 1943. Both Catherine and Gustav are buried on the property.

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Trove Tuesday - Ivy May Moore

Today's Trove Tuesday post is one begging for information.

My great, great grandmother, Margaret Jane Moore died in Wallangarra, Queensland on 1st August 1923. The following year two In Memoriam notices appeared in The Brisbane Courier.


The Brisbane Courier, 1st August 1924, p. 6
The first is from her loving son, daughter and grandchildren. This could have been either of her two sons, Knox and James and either of her daughters Rose, Elizabeth or Margaret. I believe it was from Knox and Rose who both still lived in Wallangarra.

However, it is the second notice that interests me the most. If is from her daughter Maggie and granddaughter Ivy.

I would love to contact any descendants of Ivy, the daughter of Maggie (Margaret). If anyone comes across this post and has information please contact me via the Email link on the View my complete profile link. I believe that if Ivy is still alive she would be about 97 years old in 2012.

Thursday, October 11, 2012

Ballymoney Old Church Graveyard - Dorothy Arthur

I purchased a copy of Ballymoney Old Church Graveyard by Dorothy Arthur when I was in Ireland two years ago. For anyone with family from Ballymoney or the surrounding area, this book is a must.

Dorothy Arthur has photographed and transcribed each of the headstones, and provided some information about the families.

My families from this area are Moore, Knox, Glen(n), Henry and Hanna(h). There are representatives from each of these families buried at Ballymoney. However, at this stage I can't fit any of these people into my families. One day perhaps!

If anyone has family who may be buried at Ballymoney I am more than happy to look them up in this book for you.




Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Trove Tuesday - Murder of Eileen Brennan

Trove Tuesday was begun by Amy Houston on her blog Branches Leaves & Pollen. She asked us to blog about what we've discovered and to share it with others. I think it's a great idea. I have found so many great stories on Trove so I'm attempting to blog each Tuesday. I certainly have enough material to keep me going for several months.

Last week my Trove Tuesday post told of the murder of Ellen Sullivan. Today I have another murder to share with you. I apologise if this posts upsets anyone as it happened in 1940.

Eileen Brennan was the 3rd daughter of seven children born to Thomas Vincent Brennan and his wife Kathleen Egan. She was 22 years old when she was murdered by her employer Leo Grant. He committed suicide at the murder site.

Sydney Morning Herald 16 October 1940, p. 12

The report in The Armidale Express was more detailed and stated that Leo Grant had recently purchased the Silver Bell cake shop in Beardy Street after moving from Sydney. He also had a bank book in the name of Leo Henry Murray in his pocket. His death was reported as Grant. 

A dreadful tragedy for our family and one with I imagine many unanswered questions.







Sunday, October 7, 2012

Sandgate Cemetery is online

Sandgate Cemetery is a major Newcastle cemetery which opened in 1881. The Sandgate Cemetery Trust needs to be congratulated on their fantastic website. For those of you who have seen Sandgate Cemetery you will understand why I have never tried to find any relatives buried there.

Whenever we drove past the cemetery when my children were younger they tried to hold their breath. They never managed it, especially as we had to travel along two sides of the cemetery. However, now a visit is not out of the question thanks to the fantastic location tools embedded into the website.



Approximately 95% of graves now have a virtual Google Maps latitude and longitude - the remainder of graves are being progressively co-ordinated by the Sandgate team. The first image on the window that is opened is the location of the grave shown in SATELLITE view on Google Maps as shown.
If Google Earth is installed on your computer, an EARTH button will also appear. Using Google tools in EARTH view, the grave can be zoomed in and out or moved about using mouse controls.
The location of the grave is shown at the base of the orange pointer. Where a latitude / longitude has not yet been determined, then a blank google map screen will be displayed. 
They also use QR codes.
QRcodeThe QR code is like a barcode, that is becoming more and more common and popular these days with the introduction of Smart Phones and other mobile devices such as the iPad. 
To use the facility you will need to firstly download and install a QR code App for your mobile device (there are many available to select from).
Each grave site (or surname set) will have a unique QR code at the top of the Left Hand panel.
Simply open the QR app on your mobile device, snap the code from your desktop computer of the grave that you would like to visit  when you go Sandgate. All the links are now saved in the app - you are all prepared for your visit.
Simply open the app when you get to the cemetery, click any link and the web page showing you the location of the grave in google earth and its photograph will be opened.


To find family members buried there I simply searched for those who had died in Newcastle and entered the surnames in the search box. All the graves I searched for today had a google map attached and photographs of the headstones.Those without a headstone were still photographed.

My most important find was that of my great great grandparents, William Henry and Mary Allsop. I knew they didn't have a headstone but didn't know where to find them. Thanks to the map below and the photograph of their space, I will be able to visit the site on my next trip south.

This is the information from the website.

 ALLSOP, William Henry
Por: ANGLICAN_1  Sec: 14  Lot: 125    Buried on: 3/01/1921    Lat: -32.871136666  Long: 151.707169777


Marker showing grave of William Henry and Mary Allsop at Sandgate Cemetery.

Grave of my great great grandparents William Henry and Mary Allsop.

Do you know of any other cemetery websites which are as well organised as this one? 

Saturday, October 6, 2012

What's my number?

Lorine McGinnis Schulze in her Olive Tree Genealogy Blog suggests looking at the number of ancestors you can identify  back 9 generations. There are a total of 1022 direct ancestors. Lorine suggests that many people will begin to double up on ancestors but this isn't the case with my family.

It is actually a little depressing when my figures are revealed. The first table documents my ancestors. It looks like I have only identified 11.1 % back to my 7th great grandparents. There are a few branches in which I can delve further into the past. These include Scottish, English and Irish (Church of Ireland) links. Roadblocks have been caused by Tasmanian death certificates - no parents names to get back to Norfolk research and Irish catholic research.





Generation
Number of Ancestors
My Numbers
Cumulative
Percentage 
GGGGGGG grandparents
512
5
11.1%
GGGGGG grandparents
256
9
21.%
GGGGG grandparents
128
10
38.9%
GGGG grandparents
64
27
70.6%
GGG grandparents
32
32
100%
GG grandparents
16
16
100%
Great grandparents
8
8
100%
Grandparents
4
4
100%
Parents
2
2
100%
 

The second table documents my research with my husband's families. Even more unsuccessful. However, I should be positive. A successful find a few years ago, allowed me to add 3 generations of Scheef ancestors past my husband's great grandfather.



Generation
Number of Ancestors
My Numbers
Cumulative Percentage
GGGGGGG grandparents
512
0
7.7%
GGGGGG grandparents
256
2
15.5%
GGGGG grandparents
128
8
30.3%
GGGG grandparents
64
13
54.8%
GGG grandparents
32
26
90.3%
GG grandparents
16
16
100%
Great grandparents
8
8
100%
Grandparents
4
4
100%
Parents
2
2
100%
 

Spending some time on these tables has actually helped me to identify a couple of branches where I may be able to research further. I have been spending more time recently on modern extensions to our families. 

This has certainly been a worthwhile exercise and I'll look at this table this time next year and see if I have made any progress.


Thursday, October 4, 2012

Saying goodbye to family members

Today I have officially said goodbye to several family members whom I have become very attached to over the last several years.

Goodbye to Peter Hope and his wife Lydia Prince, Peter's Hope line of John, Benjamin, Petri and Petri. The last Petri had been married in Hartington in 1653. I also had to say goodbye to Peter and Lydia's daughter Mary who married Thomas Hickenbottom, and their children and grandchildren. They were all so easy to trace. Altogether I had to say goodbye to 13 direct line ancestors.

Why? THEY ARE NOT MINE. I should be excited but I have to admit to being a little sad.

My ggg grandmother, Ann Hope married Samuel Ogden on 3rd September 1837 in the Parish of Prestwich, Manchester in the County of Lancester.

Her father, Peter Hope was a farmer and one of the witnesses to the marriage. The challenge for many years had been to find out who was Peter Hope. Ann Ogden's entry in the 1851 English census stated that she was born at Tillese. Of course I could not find Tillese. There seemed to be only one possible solution. Peter Hope from Alstonfield seemed to be the likely father. He was the only Peter Hope I could find with a daughter Ann. (Luckily I didn't visit Alstonfield on a recent trip to England - I had been tempted!)

However, recently we discovered Tillese. The correct name is Tyldesley which is a town in Manchester. It was also known as Tyldesley-with-Shakerley and was in the parish of Leigh.

The foundation stone for the church at Tyldesley was laid in 1822 and until 1829 its chapelry was dependent on Leigh.

So I think I am correct now in entering Ann Hope, daughter of Peter Hope and his wife Alice Hadkinson/Hodgkinson who was baptised on 1st August, 1818 at St Mary the Virgin, Leigh, Lancashire, England. As there was no church at Tyldesley Ann would have been baptised at Leigh. A search has revealed that her parents, Peter and Alice were married on 3 September 1815 at Leigh.

So welcome to the family, Anne, Peter and Alice. I certainly hope you are the correct ones.







Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Individual arrivals in Australia

Today I came across a nine generation chart I had made a few years ago. Many people were highlighted and it took me a minute or two to work out what it meant.

I had highlighted the names of those direct ancestors who had arrived in Australia. I decided to graph the information and this is what it revealed for my family.





Here are the results for my husband's family.




                         

My family 
  • 42 direct arrivals in Australia
  • 7 family group arrivals
  • Arrivals between 1822 and 1883
  • 2 single arrivals still to locate

My husband's family
  • 21 direct arrivals in Australia
  • 3 family group arrivals
  • Arrivals between c 1831 and 1885
  • 1 family arrival to locate
The downside of this is that my daughter wishes one of her grandparents had arrived from Great Britain and then she could get an ancestry visa. We are 2 generations to early for this to happen.

What do your arrivals look like?



Trove Tuesday - Murder of Ellen Sullivan

While reading the obituary of Mary Anne Sullivan Ryan, wife of John Ryan of Uralla, NSW, I read that her mother had been murdered when she was twelve.

Her lot in this her adopted country was marked by a very grim tragedy, for she had the extremely shocking experiences of a young mother cruelly murdered by the blacks. This tragedy occurred in the Aberfoyle district. Mrs Ryan was then only 12 years old, being the second eldest in a family of four sons and three daughters, the youngest a baby in arms.

For several years before the advent of Trove I had searched for documented evidence of the murder of Ellen Sullivan. She died before 1856 so I had difficulty deciding which Ellen Sullivan she was and without a specific year it was too overwhelming to search several years of The Armidale Express. However, once I knew about Trove this search was one of the first I performed. Although The Armidale Express is not on Trove (can't wait for this one) I knew the news would have been published further afield.

The news can be found in The Morton Bay Courier, The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, The Sydney Morning Herald. 

The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, 25 August, 1852

Unfortunately Ellen's death was not the only one at that time. The 2nd October edition of The Morton Bay Courier mentions 4 other murders in the New England - those of a Mr Meldrum and Mary Ann Mason (who was pregnant) and her 2 children.

Next Trove Tuesday - another murder in the family!